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New ADHD Drug OK’d; Pimavanserin Rejected for Dementia Psychosis

The FDA approved the ADHD medication viloxazine extended-release capsules (Qelbree), a new selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, for patients ages 6 to 17, Supernus Pharmaceuticals announced.

In other FDA news, Acadia Pharmaceuticals received a complete response letter from the agency, which declined to approve pimavanserin (Nuplazid) for hallucinations and delusions associated with dementia-related psychosis due to a lack of statistical significance in certain subgroups of the phase III HARMONY study. The treatment was approved for hallucinations and delusions associated with Parkinson’s disease psychosis in 2016.

Despite predictions that pandemic lockdowns would spur a spike in suicides, new CDC data found suicide deaths actually declined by 5.6% from 2019 to 2020, though deaths from overdose and alcohol both increased last year. (JAMA)

The FDA issued a safety update, warning about new data indicating a potential increased risk of arrhythmias in patients with pre-existing heart disease taking the bipolar disorder medication lamotrigine (Lamictal).

Adding the antidepressant fluoxetine (Prozac) to remdesivir (Veklury) further inhibited the production of COVID-19 particles in laboratory cells. (British Journal of Pharmacology)

People with ADHD were found to be at a higher risk for severe COVID-19 symptoms, including the need for hospitalization. (Journal of Attention Disorders)

Recognify Life Sciences now has a phase IIa study underway testing its investigational compound RL-007 for the treatment of cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia.

No surprise here — about two-thirds of men and one-third of women who had a psychiatric disorder in childhood or adolescence and entered juvenile detention still struggled with their disorder up to 15 years later. (ScienceDaily)

  • Kristen Monaco is a staff writer, focusing on endocrinology, psychiatry, and dermatology news. Based out of the New York City office, she’s worked at the company for nearly five years.

Source: MedicalNewsToday.com